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Home » Microsoft » Windows Server » Active Directory » Server time on DC time lags 1:30 sec from NTP source?
Server time on DC time lags 1:30 sec from NTP source? [message #161941] Fri, 09 October 2009 21:25 Go to next message
Douggg  is currently offline Douggg
Messages: 3
Registered: October 2009
Junior Member
I'm working with a non-profit who has AD on Server 2003. They've been
putting up with a time problem, the DC that's the authorative time source for
the domain is off (slow) by 1:30 sec from the NTP source. time.windows.com

Not sure how this can happen with NTP.

In researching this issue I found some documenttion saying the NTP time
server Server 2003 uses should be time-windows.com and not time.windows.com.

Can someone confirm the NTP sever?
Any idea why the Server's time would lag 1:30 sec behind the NTP server?
What utility can I use to Dx the problem?

Any assistance would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Douggg
Re: Server time on DC time lags 1:30 sec from NTP source? [message #161942 is a reply to message #161941] Fri, 09 October 2009 22:16 Go to previous messageGo to next message
aceman  is currently offline aceman  United States
Messages: 5816
Registered: July 2009
Senior Member
"Douggg" <Douggg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:0114ACAD-C39F-4540-B249-52F8EBB0D91E@microsoft.com...
> I'm working with a non-profit who has AD on Server 2003. They've been
> putting up with a time problem, the DC that's the authorative time source
> for
> the domain is off (slow) by 1:30 sec from the NTP source.
> time.windows.com
>
> Not sure how this can happen with NTP.
>
> In researching this issue I found some documenttion saying the NTP time
> server Server 2003 uses should be time-windows.com and not
> time.windows.com.
>
> Can someone confirm the NTP sever?
> Any idea why the Server's time would lag 1:30 sec behind the NTP server?
> What utility can I use to Dx the problem?
>
> Any assistance would be appreciated.
>
> Thanks,
> Douggg
>
>
>
>


I've never checked exact differences between a time source and time on a
server down to the second. Read the info below. I believe the 2 minute
tolerance is what you are seeing, since the authoritive time server on the
domain (PDC Emulator), acts as a time client to its external source.

============================================================ ======
Time sync by client to DC

How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows Server 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816042

Quoted from the above link:

All client desktop computers nominate the authenticating domain controller
as their in-bound time partner.
All member servers follow the same process that client desktop computers
follow.
All domain controllers in a domain nominate the primary domain controller
(PDC) operations master as their in-bound time partner.
All PDC operations masters follow the hierarchy of domains in the selection
of their in-bound time partner.
In this hierarchy, the PDC operations master at the root of the forest
becomes authoritative for the organization

The following quote is on the time algorithm in Windows 2000, which I
haven't seen any evidence that it has changed:
http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Configur ing-Windows-Time-Service.html
http://windowsitpro.com/article/articleid/8383/windows-time- synchronization-service.html

"When a client workstation (i.e., a Windows 2000 Professional—Win2K
Pro—machine) boots, it contacts a domain controller for authentication. When
the two computers exchange authentication packets, the client adjusts its
local time based on the target (i.e., the domain controller's) time. If the
target time is ahead of local (i.e., the client's) time by less than 2
minutes, the client immediately adjusts its time to match the target time.
If the target time is behind the local time by less than 2 minutes, the
client slows its clock over a period of 20 minutes until the two times are
in synch. If the local time is off by more than 2 minutes, the client
immediately sets its time to match the target time. . . . "

---

Troubleshooting time service:

To debug the time service:
http://blogs.msdn.com/w32time/archive/2008/02/28/configuring -the-time-service-enabling-the-debug-log.aspx

How to manually sync time between domain client and local time server
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555225
============================================================ ======

More info from my blog, which I will be adding the above information to.

Configuring the Windows Time Service for Windows Server
http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/09/18/configur ing-the-windows-time-service-for-windows-server.aspx


--
Ace

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees and
confers no rights.

Please reply back to the newsgroup or forum for collaboration benefit among
responding engineers, and to help others benefit from your resolution.

Ace Fekay, MCT, MCTS 2008, MCTS Exchange, MCSE, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSA
Messaging
Microsoft Certified Trainer

For urgent issues, please contact Microsoft PSS directly. Please check
http://support.microsoft.com for regional support phone numbers.
Re: Server time on DC time lags 1:30 sec from NTP source? [message #161943 is a reply to message #161942] Sat, 10 October 2009 00:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Douggg  is currently offline Douggg
Messages: 3
Registered: October 2009
Junior Member
I've read through your reply and the blog posts. The take away message I'm
getting here is that MSFT's keeps sloppy time which is by design. The posts
make it sound like anything 5 minutes or less off from actual time is
acceptable by MSFT's standards. (Did I get that right?)

I'm also finding it very hard to beleive that a server connected to a T1 to
the Interet would drift (behind) 1:30 secounds. But in reading the posts, it
appears that's within Microsoft's specs.

Did I get that right?

Is there any way to get any closer? Like say 10 seconds?







"Ace Fekay [MCT]" wrote:

> "Douggg" <Douggg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:0114ACAD-C39F-4540-B249-52F8EBB0D91E@microsoft.com...
> > I'm working with a non-profit who has AD on Server 2003. They've been
> > putting up with a time problem, the DC that's the authorative time source
> > for
> > the domain is off (slow) by 1:30 sec from the NTP source.
> > time.windows.com
> >
> > Not sure how this can happen with NTP.
> >
> > In researching this issue I found some documenttion saying the NTP time
> > server Server 2003 uses should be time-windows.com and not
> > time.windows.com.
> >
> > Can someone confirm the NTP sever?
> > Any idea why the Server's time would lag 1:30 sec behind the NTP server?
> > What utility can I use to Dx the problem?
> >
> > Any assistance would be appreciated.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Douggg
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> I've never checked exact differences between a time source and time on a
> server down to the second. Read the info below. I believe the 2 minute
> tolerance is what you are seeing, since the authoritive time server on the
> domain (PDC Emulator), acts as a time client to its external source.
>
> ============================================================ ======
> Time sync by client to DC
>
> How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows Server 2003
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816042
>
> Quoted from the above link:
>
> All client desktop computers nominate the authenticating domain controller
> as their in-bound time partner.
> All member servers follow the same process that client desktop computers
> follow.
> All domain controllers in a domain nominate the primary domain controller
> (PDC) operations master as their in-bound time partner.
> All PDC operations masters follow the hierarchy of domains in the selection
> of their in-bound time partner.
> In this hierarchy, the PDC operations master at the root of the forest
> becomes authoritative for the organization
>
> The following quote is on the time algorithm in Windows 2000, which I
> haven't seen any evidence that it has changed:
> http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Configur ing-Windows-Time-Service.html
> http://windowsitpro.com/article/articleid/8383/windows-time- synchronization-service.html
>
> "When a client workstation (i.e., a Windows 2000 Professional—Win2K
> Pro—machine) boots, it contacts a domain controller for authentication. When
> the two computers exchange authentication packets, the client adjusts its
> local time based on the target (i.e., the domain controller's) time. If the
> target time is ahead of local (i.e., the client's) time by less than 2
> minutes, the client immediately adjusts its time to match the target time.
> If the target time is behind the local time by less than 2 minutes, the
> client slows its clock over a period of 20 minutes until the two times are
> in synch. If the local time is off by more than 2 minutes, the client
> immediately sets its time to match the target time. . . . "
>
> ---
>
> Troubleshooting time service:
>
> To debug the time service:
> http://blogs.msdn.com/w32time/archive/2008/02/28/configuring -the-time-service-enabling-the-debug-log.aspx
>
> How to manually sync time between domain client and local time server
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555225
> ============================================================ ======
>
> More info from my blog, which I will be adding the above information to.
>
> Configuring the Windows Time Service for Windows Server
> http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/09/18/configur ing-the-windows-time-service-for-windows-server.aspx
>
>
> --
> Ace
>
> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees and
> confers no rights.
>
> Please reply back to the newsgroup or forum for collaboration benefit among
> responding engineers, and to help others benefit from your resolution.
>
> Ace Fekay, MCT, MCTS 2008, MCTS Exchange, MCSE, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSA
> Messaging
> Microsoft Certified Trainer
>
> For urgent issues, please contact Microsoft PSS directly. Please check
> http://support.microsoft.com for regional support phone numbers.
>
>
>
Re: Server time on DC time lags 1:30 sec from NTP source? [message #161944 is a reply to message #161943] Sat, 10 October 2009 02:00 Go to previous messageGo to next message
meiweb  is currently offline meiweb  Germany
Messages: 2225
Registered: September 2009
Senior Member
Hello Douggg,

Maybe you cna use another time source to get closer, personal i never realized
this differences with our time.

See here for some other time sources:
http://www.pool.ntp.org/

Best regards

Meinolf Weber
Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers
no rights.
** Please do NOT email, only reply to Newsgroups
** HELP us help YOU!!! http://www.blakjak.demon.co.uk/mul_crss.htm


> I've read through your reply and the blog posts. The take away
> message I'm getting here is that MSFT's keeps sloppy time which is by
> design. The posts make it sound like anything 5 minutes or less off
> from actual time is acceptable by MSFT's standards. (Did I get that
> right?)
>
> I'm also finding it very hard to beleive that a server connected to a
> T1 to the Interet would drift (behind) 1:30 secounds. But in reading
> the posts, it appears that's within Microsoft's specs.
>
> Did I get that right?
>
> Is there any way to get any closer? Like say 10 seconds?
>
> "Ace Fekay [MCT]" wrote:
>
>> "Douggg" <Douggg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:0114ACAD-C39F-4540-B249-52F8EBB0D91E@microsoft.com...
>>
>>> I'm working with a non-profit who has AD on Server 2003. They've
>>> been
>>> putting up with a time problem, the DC that's the authorative time
>>> source
>>> for
>>> the domain is off (slow) by 1:30 sec from the NTP source.
>>> time.windows.com
>>> Not sure how this can happen with NTP.
>>>
>>> In researching this issue I found some documenttion saying the NTP
>>> time server Server 2003 uses should be time-windows.com and not
>>> time.windows.com.
>>>
>>> Can someone confirm the NTP sever?
>>> Any idea why the Server's time would lag 1:30 sec behind the NTP
>>> server?
>>> What utility can I use to Dx the problem?
>>> Any assistance would be appreciated.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Douggg
>> I've never checked exact differences between a time source and time
>> on a server down to the second. Read the info below. I believe the 2
>> minute tolerance is what you are seeing, since the authoritive time
>> server on the domain (PDC Emulator), acts as a time client to its
>> external source.
>>
>> ============================================================ ======
>> Time sync by client to DC
>>
>> How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows Server 2003
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816042
>>
>> Quoted from the above link:
>>
>> All client desktop computers nominate the authenticating domain
>> controller
>> as their in-bound time partner.
>> All member servers follow the same process that client desktop
>> computers
>> follow.
>> All domain controllers in a domain nominate the primary domain
>> controller
>> (PDC) operations master as their in-bound time partner.
>> All PDC operations masters follow the hierarchy of domains in the
>> selection
>> of their in-bound time partner.
>> In this hierarchy, the PDC operations master at the root of the
>> forest
>> becomes authoritative for the organization
>> The following quote is on the time algorithm in Windows 2000, which I
>> haven't seen any evidence that it has changed:
>> http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Configur ing-Windo
>> ws-Time-Service.html
>> http://windowsitpro.com/article/articleid/8383/windows-time- synchroni
>> zation-service.html
>> "When a client workstation (i.e., a Windows 2000 Professional-Win2K
>> Pro-machine) boots, it contacts a domain controller for
>> authentication. When the two computers exchange authentication
>> packets, the client adjusts its local time based on the target (i.e.,
>> the domain controller's) time. If the target time is ahead of local
>> (i.e., the client's) time by less than 2 minutes, the client
>> immediately adjusts its time to match the target time. If the target
>> time is behind the local time by less than 2 minutes, the client
>> slows its clock over a period of 20 minutes until the two times are
>> in synch. If the local time is off by more than 2 minutes, the client
>> immediately sets its time to match the target time. . . . "
>>
>> ---
>>
>> Troubleshooting time service:
>>
>> To debug the time service:
>> http://blogs.msdn.com/w32time/archive/2008/02/28/configuring -the-time
>> -service-enabling-the-debug-log.aspx
>> How to manually sync time between domain client and local time server
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555225
>> ============================================================ ======
>>
>> More info from my blog, which I will be adding the above information
>> to.
>>
>> Configuring the Windows Time Service for Windows Server
>>
>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/09/18/configur ing-the-w
>> indows-time-service-for-windows-server.aspx
>>
>> -- Ace
>>
>> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees and
>> confers no rights.
>>
>> Please reply back to the newsgroup or forum for collaboration benefit
>> among responding engineers, and to help others benefit from your
>> resolution.
>>
>> Ace Fekay, MCT, MCTS 2008, MCTS Exchange, MCSE, MCSA 2003 & 2000,
>> MCSA
>> Messaging
>> Microsoft Certified Trainer
>> For urgent issues, please contact Microsoft PSS directly. Please
>> check http://support.microsoft.com for regional support phone
>> numbers.
>>
Re: Server time on DC time lags 1:30 sec from NTP source? [message #161947 is a reply to message #161944] Sat, 10 October 2009 09:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Douggg  is currently offline Douggg
Messages: 3
Registered: October 2009
Junior Member
Not sure how I could get a closer time source. The RTT is 70 msec to the NTP
server. I just can't figure out why MSFT lags 1:30 seconds.





"Meinolf Weber [MVP-DS]" wrote:

> Hello Douggg,
>
> Maybe you cna use another time source to get closer, personal i never realized
> this differences with our time.
>
> See here for some other time sources:
> http://www.pool.ntp.org/
>
> Best regards
>
> Meinolf Weber
> Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers
> no rights.
> ** Please do NOT email, only reply to Newsgroups
> ** HELP us help YOU!!! http://www.blakjak.demon.co.uk/mul_crss.htm
>
>
> > I've read through your reply and the blog posts. The take away
> > message I'm getting here is that MSFT's keeps sloppy time which is by
> > design. The posts make it sound like anything 5 minutes or less off
> > from actual time is acceptable by MSFT's standards. (Did I get that
> > right?)
> >
> > I'm also finding it very hard to beleive that a server connected to a
> > T1 to the Interet would drift (behind) 1:30 secounds. But in reading
> > the posts, it appears that's within Microsoft's specs.
> >
> > Did I get that right?
> >
> > Is there any way to get any closer? Like say 10 seconds?
> >
> > "Ace Fekay [MCT]" wrote:
> >
> >> "Douggg" <Douggg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> >> news:0114ACAD-C39F-4540-B249-52F8EBB0D91E@microsoft.com...
> >>
> >>> I'm working with a non-profit who has AD on Server 2003. They've
> >>> been
> >>> putting up with a time problem, the DC that's the authorative time
> >>> source
> >>> for
> >>> the domain is off (slow) by 1:30 sec from the NTP source.
> >>> time.windows.com
> >>> Not sure how this can happen with NTP.
> >>>
> >>> In researching this issue I found some documenttion saying the NTP
> >>> time server Server 2003 uses should be time-windows.com and not
> >>> time.windows.com.
> >>>
> >>> Can someone confirm the NTP sever?
> >>> Any idea why the Server's time would lag 1:30 sec behind the NTP
> >>> server?
> >>> What utility can I use to Dx the problem?
> >>> Any assistance would be appreciated.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks,
> >>> Douggg
> >> I've never checked exact differences between a time source and time
> >> on a server down to the second. Read the info below. I believe the 2
> >> minute tolerance is what you are seeing, since the authoritive time
> >> server on the domain (PDC Emulator), acts as a time client to its
> >> external source.
> >>
> >> ============================================================ ======
> >> Time sync by client to DC
> >>
> >> How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows Server 2003
> >> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816042
> >>
> >> Quoted from the above link:
> >>
> >> All client desktop computers nominate the authenticating domain
> >> controller
> >> as their in-bound time partner.
> >> All member servers follow the same process that client desktop
> >> computers
> >> follow.
> >> All domain controllers in a domain nominate the primary domain
> >> controller
> >> (PDC) operations master as their in-bound time partner.
> >> All PDC operations masters follow the hierarchy of domains in the
> >> selection
> >> of their in-bound time partner.
> >> In this hierarchy, the PDC operations master at the root of the
> >> forest
> >> becomes authoritative for the organization
> >> The following quote is on the time algorithm in Windows 2000, which I
> >> haven't seen any evidence that it has changed:
> >> http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Configur ing-Windo
> >> ws-Time-Service.html
> >> http://windowsitpro.com/article/articleid/8383/windows-time- synchroni
> >> zation-service.html
> >> "When a client workstation (i.e., a Windows 2000 Professional-Win2K
> >> Pro-machine) boots, it contacts a domain controller for
> >> authentication. When the two computers exchange authentication
> >> packets, the client adjusts its local time based on the target (i.e.,
> >> the domain controller's) time. If the target time is ahead of local
> >> (i.e., the client's) time by less than 2 minutes, the client
> >> immediately adjusts its time to match the target time. If the target
> >> time is behind the local time by less than 2 minutes, the client
> >> slows its clock over a period of 20 minutes until the two times are
> >> in synch. If the local time is off by more than 2 minutes, the client
> >> immediately sets its time to match the target time. . . . "
> >>
> >> ---
> >>
> >> Troubleshooting time service:
> >>
> >> To debug the time service:
> >> http://blogs.msdn.com/w32time/archive/2008/02/28/configuring -the-time
> >> -service-enabling-the-debug-log.aspx
> >> How to manually sync time between domain client and local time server
> >> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555225
> >> ============================================================ ======
> >>
> >> More info from my blog, which I will be adding the above information
> >> to.
> >>
> >> Configuring the Windows Time Service for Windows Server
> >>
> >> http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/09/18/configur ing-the-w
> >> indows-time-service-for-windows-server.aspx
> >>
> >> -- Ace
> >>
> >> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees and
> >> confers no rights.
> >>
> >> Please reply back to the newsgroup or forum for collaboration benefit
> >> among responding engineers, and to help others benefit from your
> >> resolution.
> >>
> >> Ace Fekay, MCT, MCTS 2008, MCTS Exchange, MCSE, MCSA 2003 & 2000,
> >> MCSA
> >> Messaging
> >> Microsoft Certified Trainer
> >> For urgent issues, please contact Microsoft PSS directly. Please
> >> check http://support.microsoft.com for regional support phone
> >> numbers.
> >>
>
>
>
Re: Server time on DC time lags 1:30 sec from NTP source? [message #161948 is a reply to message #161943] Sat, 10 October 2009 09:57 Go to previous message
aceman  is currently offline aceman  United States
Messages: 5816
Registered: July 2009
Senior Member
"Douggg" <Douggg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:6B1D13F4-D9AF-49DD-A53A-07FD7659A081@microsoft.com...

Yep, you read that right. Microsoft says the time service has a tolerance of
2 minutes, and if anything less, it ignores the difference. That's what you
are seeing with the 1.5 minute thing. Even Microsoft says in the link in my
blog, that it is not accurate down to the second, and if you have a critical
service or application (such as banking transactions) where you need that
kind of timing accuracy down to the second, you must use a third party time
service on your machines instead of the default time service. The 2 minute
tolerance is partially why (along with time settings propagation in an
infrastructure) Microsoft has set Kerberos with a 5 minute skew allowance in
time differences during the authentication sequence. Kerberos uses time as a
'salt' to insure the authentication request is not an actual replay and is
happening in real time.

Ace

> I've read through your reply and the blog posts. The take away message
> I'm
> getting here is that MSFT's keeps sloppy time which is by design. The
> posts
> make it sound like anything 5 minutes or less off from actual time is
> acceptable by MSFT's standards. (Did I get that right?)
>
> I'm also finding it very hard to beleive that a server connected to a T1
> to
> the Interet would drift (behind) 1:30 secounds. But in reading the posts,
> it
> appears that's within Microsoft's specs.
>
> Did I get that right?
>
> Is there any way to get any closer? Like say 10 seconds?
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Ace Fekay [MCT]" wrote:
>
>> "Douggg" <Douggg@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:0114ACAD-C39F-4540-B249-52F8EBB0D91E@microsoft.com...
>> > I'm working with a non-profit who has AD on Server 2003. They've been
>> > putting up with a time problem, the DC that's the authorative time
>> > source
>> > for
>> > the domain is off (slow) by 1:30 sec from the NTP source.
>> > time.windows.com
>> >
>> > Not sure how this can happen with NTP.
>> >
>> > In researching this issue I found some documenttion saying the NTP time
>> > server Server 2003 uses should be time-windows.com and not
>> > time.windows.com.
>> >
>> > Can someone confirm the NTP sever?
>> > Any idea why the Server's time would lag 1:30 sec behind the NTP
>> > server?
>> > What utility can I use to Dx the problem?
>> >
>> > Any assistance would be appreciated.
>> >
>> > Thanks,
>> > Douggg
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>> I've never checked exact differences between a time source and time on a
>> server down to the second. Read the info below. I believe the 2 minute
>> tolerance is what you are seeing, since the authoritive time server on
>> the
>> domain (PDC Emulator), acts as a time client to its external source.
>>
>> ============================================================ ======
>> Time sync by client to DC
>>
>> How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows Server 2003
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816042
>>
>> Quoted from the above link:
>>
>> All client desktop computers nominate the authenticating domain
>> controller
>> as their in-bound time partner.
>> All member servers follow the same process that client desktop computers
>> follow.
>> All domain controllers in a domain nominate the primary domain controller
>> (PDC) operations master as their in-bound time partner.
>> All PDC operations masters follow the hierarchy of domains in the
>> selection
>> of their in-bound time partner.
>> In this hierarchy, the PDC operations master at the root of the forest
>> becomes authoritative for the organization
>>
>> The following quote is on the time algorithm in Windows 2000, which I
>> haven't seen any evidence that it has changed:
>> http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/Configur ing-Windows-Time-Service.html
>> http://windowsitpro.com/article/articleid/8383/windows-time- synchronization-service.html
>>
>> "When a client workstation (i.e., a Windows 2000 Professional—Win2K
>> Pro—machine) boots, it contacts a domain controller for authentication.
>> When
>> the two computers exchange authentication packets, the client adjusts its
>> local time based on the target (i.e., the domain controller's) time. If
>> the
>> target time is ahead of local (i.e., the client's) time by less than 2
>> minutes, the client immediately adjusts its time to match the target
>> time.
>> If the target time is behind the local time by less than 2 minutes, the
>> client slows its clock over a period of 20 minutes until the two times
>> are
>> in synch. If the local time is off by more than 2 minutes, the client
>> immediately sets its time to match the target time. . . . "
>>
>> ---
>>
>> Troubleshooting time service:
>>
>> To debug the time service:
>> http://blogs.msdn.com/w32time/archive/2008/02/28/configuring -the-time-service-enabling-the-debug-log.aspx
>>
>> How to manually sync time between domain client and local time server
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555225
>> ============================================================ ======
>>
>> More info from my blog, which I will be adding the above information to.
>>
>> Configuring the Windows Time Service for Windows Server
>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/09/18/configur ing-the-windows-time-service-for-windows-server.aspx
>>
>>
>> --
>> Ace
>>
>> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees and
>> confers no rights.
>>
>> Please reply back to the newsgroup or forum for collaboration benefit
>> among
>> responding engineers, and to help others benefit from your resolution.
>>
>> Ace Fekay, MCT, MCTS 2008, MCTS Exchange, MCSE, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSA
>> Messaging
>> Microsoft Certified Trainer
>>
>> For urgent issues, please contact Microsoft PSS directly. Please check
>> http://support.microsoft.com for regional support phone numbers.
>>
>>
>>
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